I can’t even look at myself ‘down there’ and I feel queasy just considering penetration or any type of vaginal insertion. How can I make it through treatment?

I can’t even look at myself “down there” and I feel queasy just considering penetration or any type of vaginal insertion. How can I make it through treatment?

 

The human mind has amazing capability to influence our physical being. Fears are generally diminished and overcome with knowledge and a proactive approach to one’s health.

Anxiety related to one’s body often stems from lack of knowledge, inadequate sex education, religious/cultural prohibitions against accepting one’s body and sexuality, painful past experiences, and poor self-body image. It is important that during the treatment process these issues are confronted and dealt with appropriately.

 

“Whole Woman” Approach

A successful, effective treatment program will address these aspects and assist women in changing the way they view themselves and help them to grow in confidence. Knowledge, combined with a step-by-step process of self-exploration and working through unhealthy emotions, helps women become more comfortable with their bodies and work toward attainable solutions for their condition.

 

Understanding Why Some Women Feel Queasy

The queasy feeling described may be due to the “vasovagal syncope” effect, a common body response to the fear of possible perceived pain or trauma. A common example is what happens to some people when they get a needle. They may begin to sweat, turn pale, shake, hyperventilate and possibly even pass out, just at the mere sight of the needle. The human mind has amazing capability to influence our physical being.

Queasy episodes will typically subside as fears are diminished with knowledge and confidence with familiarity through the treatment process. Solutions could include simply recognizing the problem when it begins to occur and taking measures such as lying down and elevating legs to avoid fainting.

Taking deep breaths and recalling declarations (Step 2) may also be helpful. Where this is a persistent issue, women are advised to consult with their health care provider.

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